Bobby Clarke, the NHL office has your back…

The newest biggest thing on the intertubes is the Wikipedia Scanner, which lets you see what edits were made to Wikipedia entries from which IPs. Wired has some of the better ones up here.

Of course, being a hockey fan, I was curious to see what might be arousing the editing of the powers-that-be in the NHL.

A check on the Columbus Blue Jackets’ corporate IPs came up with nothing that interesting, one change to some computer techie article. Not the widespread editing of the “Doug MacLean” entry I was hoping for.

I had better luck with the NHL.

Someone there is pretty interested in the history of various banks. As for hockey related stuff, the mystery NHL editor made some minor factual corrections to several pages, and also noted that Islander fans hope to see Steve Webb back. They also saw fit to edit John Vanbiesbrouck’s autobiography to discuss the racial slur that lost him his job in the Soo.

The one that made me fall over giggling was the “Valery Kharlamov” entry, where someone in the NHL office cleaned up some editorial comment about Bobby Clarke.

Here’s the original:

However, it was during the [[1972 Summit Series]] that Valery Kharlamov, along with teammate [[Vladislav Tretiak]], became the talk of the hockey world. At [[Montreal, Quebec|Montreal]], [[Canada]], in game one of the eight game international series against the best professionals from Canada, a virtually unknown Valery Kharlamov astonished Canadian fans and their star hockey team with his explosive speed, agility, and goal scoring prowess. Kharlamov was voted the game’s MVP after he scored two goals while leading his team to an upset victory that shook the foundations of North American professional ice hockey to the core. Such was the effect of Kharlamov that in game six of the fiercely fought series, Canada’s [[Bobby Clarke]], a notoriously dirty player with the [[Philadelphia Flyers]], chased Kharlamov down and struck a vicious two-handed slash on his left ankle. Although he bravely continued in game six, he was unable to play in game seven and was ineffective in the final game. Most knowledgeable observers believe this unwarranted assault by Clarke was a crucial incident which contributed to turn the tide of the series in Canada’s favour. Years later, [[John Ferguson, Sr.]], an assistant coach with Team Canada, was quoted as saying “I called Clarke over to the bench, looked over at Kharlamov and said, ‘I think he needs a tap on the ankle.’ I didn’t think twice about it. It was Us versus Them. And Kharlamov was killing us. I mean, somebody had to do it.”

Here’s the version edited by someone with a National Hockey League IP address:

However, it was during the [[1972 Summit Series]] that Valery Kharlamov, along with teammate [[Vladislav Tretiak]], became the talk of the hockey world. At [[Montreal, Quebec|Montreal]], [[Canada]], in game one of the eight game international series against the best professionals from Canada, a virtually unknown Valery Kharlamov astonished Canadian fans and their star hockey team with his explosive speed, agility, and goal scoring prowess. Kharlamov was voted the game’s MVP after he scored two goals while leading his team to an upset victory that shook the foundations of North American professional ice hockey to the core. Such was the effect of Kharlamov that in game six of the fiercely fought series, Canada’s [[Bobby Clarke]], of the [[Philadelphia Flyers]], slashed Kharlamov on his left ankle. Although he bravely continued in game six, he was unable to play in game seven and was ineffective in the final game. Some observers believe this injury was a crucial incident which contributed to turn the tide of the series in Canada’s favour. Some believe it was retaliation for Kharlamov’s constant slashing. He was the most penalized Soviet player in the series, his minutes exceeded only by Clarke and J.P. Parise, who had an altercation with an official. Years later, [[John Ferguson, Sr.]], an assistant coach with Team Canada, was quoted as saying “I called Clarke over to the bench, looked over at Kharlamov and said, ‘I think he needs a tap on the ankle.’ I didn’t think twice about it. It was Us versus Them. And Kharlamov was killing us. I mean, somebody had to do it.”

I LOL’ed.

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